WISE Network Consultant Clare Bishop has devised a tool for assessing the gender responsiveness of agribusiness initiatives. On her recent blog on The Practitioner Hub for Inclusive Business, Clare Bishop writes about a tool that has been developed during a recent study undertaken by the Global Donor Platform for Rural Development on women’s empowerment in agribusiness. The […]

Since January 2016, WISE has been working with Nathan Associates to help to address gender based constraints on the Market Development Programme (MADE) for Northern Ghana which is in its third year of implementation. The UKAid funded programme uses a market systems approach, Making Markets Work for the Poor (M4P) aimed at facilitating and stimulating sustainable economic transformation through agribusinesses and rural enterprises

WISE Development has been supporting a range of programmes to integrate gender equality and women’s empowerment, specifically women’s economic empowerment, since 2001. Recent work on social enterprise and social movements has added to our learning. We have found that culture, attitudes and behaviours within programme teams and within companies influence how well they can integrate approaches for gender equality and women’s empowerment.

Two co-ops set up by WISE’s partner in India, SAMPARK, to support women’s economic empowerment self-help groups in Karnataka, India, have been awarded prestigious awards for the work that they do.

In response to a growing number of applications for gender training, WISE Development is addressing the question of gender training in the context of ‘gender and organisational change’. This means supporting organisations over a period of time to build gender knowledge and practical skills to improve practice. The WISE approach recognises the importance of building capacity across the whole organisation and positioning gender interventions in the context of organisational change. The starting point for WISE is therefore a process to get to know the organisation and its approach to learning and change

Dinah Bennett OBE showcases a UK-based creative social enterprise that has successfully translated its social aims for women into hard economic impacts

“From the glass cliff to the gender stress gap, from financial crisis to family crisis, women leaders face a number of converging personal, professional and global challenges. In the face of such momentous change and challenges, resilience as a simple notion of “bouncing back” isn’t enough”
Read Ama Marston’s article in full

The participation of women at all levels and the strengthening of the women’s movement has never been so critical, working together with boys and men, to empower nations, build stronger economies and healthier societies. It is the key to making Agenda 2030 transformational and inclusive

Violence against women and girls (VAWG) is a global problem because it is an abuse of human rights and has serious human capacity and vulnerability consequences for women. An estimated 35 per cent of women over the age of 15, some 818 million women globally, have experienced sexual or physical violence

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